Working life Akava poll: Half of companies want to cut wages locally

Labor Market Director: “It’s surprising that so many companies want to agree on pay cuts, layoffs and layoffs.”

More materials for a discussion on a local deal were obtained on Tuesday when the Akava think tank launched a recent business survey. The results show that as many as half of business executives want to negotiate pay cuts locally.

More than 60 percent of business employers want to negotiate layoffs and layoffs locally.

According to a survey commissioned by Akava Works, a total of almost 90 percent of business employers want to negotiate working conditions locally. The most common is the desire to negotiate not only wages but also working hours.

“Is surprisingly, so many companies want to agree on pay cuts, layoffs and layoffs. Unfortunately, it says that many employers have a desire to agree locally on deteriorating working conditions and employment security, ”says Akava’s labor market director. Katarina Murto.

Business Research Institute Etlan research director Antti Kauhanen commenting on Monday, commenting on a report by TP on Industrial Wage earners on a local agreement, companies do not want to lower wages.

According to Kauhanen, the reason is that a pay cut would reduce employee motivation and make the best employees change jobs.

“There is some evidence that local agreement raises both wages and productivity,” Kauhanen said.

Akavan According to the survey, local agreements are already common in companies, with around 70% of companies having concluded local agreements in the previous three years.

In certain cases, local agreement is even more common in unorganized companies that comply with a universally binding collective agreement than in companies that are members of an employers’ association.

“Local agreement can achieve flexibility as well as well-being at work and productivity benefits. Wage increases and working conditions that are better than the minimum level of the collective agreement can still be agreed upon today, ”Murto says in a press release.

“However, the promotion and benefits of local agreement threaten to be blurred if it is not made clear what it aims for, why and at what level.”

Shop stewards that is, the role of interlocutors is a key issue in increasing workplace agreement.

Next Monday in his performance submission in the tripartite working group of the Ministry of Employment and the Economy the position of shop stewards sharply divides the views of employers ‘and employees’ representatives.

According to an Akava survey, more than 80 percent of business employers want to negotiate working conditions primarily with a non-employee-elected representative.

Nearly half of unorganized employers who comply with a universally binding collective agreement want to negotiate directly with staff and just under 40 percent with an individual employee.

Of organized companies, 36 percent want to negotiate directly with staff and 35 percent with an individual employee.

Upper Chairman of the Senior Officials, YTN, a negotiating body representing employees Teemu Hankamäki is concerned about the desire to negotiate a reduction in working conditions without a staff representative.

“There are many opportunities for agreement, but negotiations require time, trust and expertise. The more equal the negotiating position in the workplace, the more likely it is that the agreement will be successful and that it is a genuine agreement, ”Hankamäki estimates in the press release.

The company survey was conducted by Kantar TNS for Akava Works. For the survey, a survey of more than five hundred companies was collected through telephone interviews.

Companies with less than five employees and state and municipal enterprises were excluded.

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