Peru | On Sunday, Peruvians will elect a historic unpopular president from two unpopular candidates

Opposite are the daughter of a former president imprisoned for human rights abuses and a teacher in a rural school feared to be a communist.

South America Peru currently has the highest coronary mortality rate in the world. On the last day of May, the Ministry of Health published revised statistics and overall mortality increased from less than 70,000 to more than 180,000, according to Doctors Without Borders.

Hospitals are full, but on Sunday, Peruvians head to the urn and elect a new president. Voting turnout is high in Peru. The reason is the compulsion to vote, not the Peruvians’ desire to vote.

Only in a few elections, people have chosen the leader as reluctantly as the Peruvians this summer. Opposite are candidates from the far left and the far right: a former rural school teacher Pedro Castillo and the daughter of the imprisoned former president Keiko Fujimori.

For the second round, the extremist candidates were only winged by the fact that, according to the Peruvians, there were no better alternatives.

Experts, among others, say the BBC, according to the British Broadcasting Corporation, that whichever won, he will not become the whole Peru’s favorite. Castillo’s and Fujimori’s sound catches in the first round were so weak that they did not even add up above one third of those who voted, says Deutsche Welle, for example.

For the second round, the extremist candidates were only winged by the fact that, according to the Peruvians, there were no better alternatives.

Keiko Fujimori is nominated as President of Peru for the third time. On the previous two occasions, he has lost the second round.

Promising “hard grips,” Fujimori is an economic liberal and a value conservative. If she wins, she would be Peru’s first female president.

Keiko Fujimori has been in politics since he was young, for his father Alberto Fujimori served as President of Peru throughout the 1990s.

The legacy left by the father does not alleviate Keiko Fujimori’s position. Alberto Fujimori’s term ended in exile, and he now sits in prison convicted of several crimes, including crimes against humanity.

Keiko Fukimor’s own reputation is not pure either. He has been charged for decades on suspicion of money laundering.

In buzz crumpled Keiko Fukimori may also receive votes on Sunday from Peruvians who would never have imagined voting for anyone in the Fukimori family. The reason is a candidate barked as a communist.

The Latin American right tends to accuse every candidate on the left of being Marxist. In the case of Pedro Castillo, however, the argument is not as false as usual.

Pedro Castillo has been a teacher in a poor rural school for more than two decades. He rose to prominence in 2017, leading months of teacher protests.

For example, Castillo promises voters free education and the nationalization of natural resources. He has also announced that he will abolish the Constitutional Court if elected.

Cities do not understand the reality of rural areas and the fact that the years of economic growth have not improved life in all sparsely populated areas.

In the first the popularity of Castillo, who arrived in the urn on horseback during the ballot, surprised many in the Peruvian capital, Lima. There, the support of the far-left candidate remained at only about four per cent.

The surprise highlights how divided Peru is. Cities do not understand the reality of rural areas and the fact that the years of economic growth have not improved life in all sparsely populated areas. Instead inequality has increased.

In the countryside some people see modest conditions as coming from Castillo. However, experts are concerned about what the choice of the far left would mean for democracy.

“If we elect Mr Castillo in the second round, there will probably be no more free elections in Peruvian history,” said the Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa Peruvian According to the Gestión business newspaper.

Others have pointed out that the Fukimor family has also ruled Peru in authoritarian terms.

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