Medicine North American study: Female patients had worse outcomes when surgery was performed by a male surgeon

A study looking at surgery between 2007 and 2019 found that women who underwent surgery by male surgeons were 32 percent more likely to die than women undergoing surgery by a female surgeon.

Fresh according to a North American study, the outcome of surgical treatment received by female patients was worse when the surgeon was a man. The study is reported by a British newspaper, among others The Guardian.

Scientific publication

In JAMA Surgery

the published study looked at data from more than 1.3 million patients. Nearly 3,000 surgeons underwent surgery between 2007 and 2019 in Ontario, Canada. The country’s most populous province includes Toronto, a city of millions.

A study conducted by Canadian and U.S. universities looked at the post-operative inconveniences.

For example, the study found that female patients who underwent surgery by a male surgeon were 15 percent more likely to experience surgery-related side effects than those who underwent surgery by a female surgeon. Women operated on by male surgeons were 32 percent more likely to die than female patients who underwent surgery by a female surgeon.

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Overall, the study found that female patients had a 16 percent higher risk of complications and an 11 percent higher risk of returning to hospital. In addition, female patients had a 20 percent higher risk of having to stay in hospital for longer.

Research an assistant professor at the University of Toronto who participated in the act Angela Jerathin according to the results are worrying as the gender of the patient should not affect the outcome of the treatment.

According to Jerath, female surgeons tend to have better outcomes, especially for women. The situation remains the same even if other possible influencing factors, such as age, are taken into account.

In surgeries performed by female surgeons, the patient’s gender had no effect on the outcome of treatment.

According to Jerath, differences can be explained by deep-rooted prejudices, stereotypes, and attitudes. In addition, there may be differences in the communication skills of male and female surgeons. The study notes that further research is needed on this topic.

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