HS Environment Rapidly advancing climate change is changing the Arctic vegetation, especially frost rot is shaping plants

Frost rot is the result of soil freezing and thawing, which causes the soil to mix and migrate.

Quickly Advancing climate change is also changing Arctic vegetation, according to a recent study by the University of Oulu.

The study was conducted by an international team of natural geologists and ecologists. A postdoctoral researcher and natural geographer from the University of Oulu was involved Julia Kemppinen.

Extensive data from more than 200 plant species from Svalbard, Greenland and Fennoscandia were collected for the study.

The researchers looked at how surface processes affect the properties of Arctic plants. In the Arctic environment, for example, plants will remain smaller because they will have to withstand extreme conditions.

Researchers found that frostbite in particular modifies plants, the University of Oulu’s press release states.

Frost rot is the result of soil freezing and thawing, which causes the soil to mix and migrate. This affects the plants.

“As a result of the frostbite, the plants will be short,” Kemppainen says in a press release.

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“On the other hand, the mixing of soil can also bring nutrients from deeper soil layers to the surface, and this is reflected in the nutrient content of the leaves,” says Kemppinen.

The results also showed that the response of the plants to the changes that took place was similar in different parts of the north.

The study has been published Global Ecology and Biogeography -in leaf.

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