Columns The director of the nursing home reminded me why it is worth thinking about the passage of time – in the last moments of life, what is most important is revealed

Would something very important not be done or said if the departure came today, Maaret Kallio asks in his column.

“I think that the most important task of the rest of my life now is to sleep and rest. ”

I was sitting on the edge of my 92-year-old grandfather’s bed for a long time. Grandpa stroked my dog, who got to go pretty close, without safety gaps and masks, unlike me. The gaze no longer reaches, and not always words. The dog’s silky coat still feels good and the mind likes to travel to the past.

“I think I’m starting to be a little old,” Grandpa said. I laughed and told that I recently claimed the same for my children.

We remembered many moments we had together years ago. Cottage trips to Parkano and how to make earring holes in a local small shop. We thought about my work as a bus driver and important leisure moments in the bliss of painting paintings. “How much did I do before that,” Grandpa always sighed again between reminiscences.

“I think I’m starting to be a little old,” Grandpa said. I laughed and told that I recently claimed the same for my children. Me, a grandchild almost 50 years younger. “Maybe you can really think so for a while at that age,” Grandpa comments softly, from a completely different point in the life cycle.

Stay stayed with my grandparents for many days and it seemed like the most important task of the holiday. The postcards were re-read and the relatives went through. I baked spinach pancakes, changed sheets with my grandmother and went to the store.

Like my own children, now my grandparents sat happily at the dining table and asked for more pancakes and jam.

Add pancakes and jam. Even when the task of life is no longer mainly to sleep and rest.

While we may not have time to control, we can have a huge impact on where we spend the time of our only lives.

“In time is a huge power. The only one who ultimately has power, ”says the director of the nursing home, a social psychologist, stopping Riikka Koivisto, which I interviewed for my latest nonfiction book.

We met in a nursing home where awareness of the lack of time is inevitably present. The presence of the limitations of life and death brightens the colors of life. Everything useless and superficial is blatantly revealed, especially in a time when the finish line is already visible.

We sat down to discuss the good life in the house, where each patient leaves only in a coffin. It was time that became the deepest theme of our long discussion – its limitations, its end and, above all, its use throughout life.

While we may not have time to control, we can have a huge impact on where we spend the time of our only lives. What we do, what we choose, what we fix, who we care for, who we love, and who we let love. What we leave in this world, what kind of memories for others, what kind of deeds for the common good. If you are at peace with your life, you can also be more at peace with your death.

Central to the study was the fact that man felt that he had left a good mark on the world and others with his life.

In hospice care in the study of the hope of the patients present, a key factor of hope was that the person felt that he or she was living with his or her life. That he felt he had left a good mark on the world and others with his life.

The hope of recent times is eaten by the grief of not having time or daring to live a life that would have been most meaningful to oneself and others.

From the point of view of death, the dignity and time of life come to the fore. As long as there is time, there is also an opportunity for hope and influence. Hope, in all its comfort, is a demanding force. It asks the person in the middle of their life which direction you are going. What do you say, do, free and what do you cover up, hide and shame?

As life goes on as usual, it would be important to wake up strongly to the limitations of one’s own life and self, the dominance of time, and the dignity of humanity. It is only a murky ring of words to speak of their values ​​if actions, customs, and actions do not align on their behalf. The power of hope reveals its true face at the level of our repeated deeds. Would something very important be left undone or unsaid if the departure came today?

As I left Grandma and Grandpa in my body, there was a deep longing for a hug. It was given by a dog that once again went pretty close. Before closing the door, I said, “You are so dear.”

Just in case, because you never know about life.

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